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Time to slay your own dragons, ladies.

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My first kiss was an unwanted one. I was seven years old when a boy named David pushed me up against the wall outside our apartment building. Forcing his mouth on mine, his breath, hot and fusty, something sickly sweet like apple juice and milk gone sour in his gut that made me squirm. I don’t remember seeing him as I ran with my brother and the other neighborhood kids through the empty lot next door, scrabbling over the toppled trees, slick with moss, tripping over the bramble of twigs and woodsy decay, but he must have been there, his knees as scratched and muddied as ours, before he caught up with me in the driveway that ran alongside and behind the apartment building. 
As usual I’d tagged along in my older brother’s shadow. Tag, hide and seek, cowboys and indians, the games kids used to play. Outdoors, up and down the streets, no watchful mommies on red alert. Ignoring our mothers’ warnings—don’t go into the woods, don’t go into the woods—we went into the woods, woods that in fact …

Dreaming of France: Trompe l'oeil

photo credit: moi

The trompe l'oeil technique used here works better on a sunny day when the real sky matches the painted blue sky on the building. On the day we visited this spot in the 10th arrondisment, the grey clouds visited the neighborhood too.

Literally, to deceive the eye, the official definition of the French phrase trompe l'oeil is
• visual illusion in art, especially as used to trick the eye into perceiving a painted detail as a three-dimensional object. 
We spotted this one on the Rue du la Faubourg above a storefront near the Gare de l’est. But that’s all I know about it and so far, even my friend Google, has been of little help. I have no idea what he initials ELZA stand for, they don’t seem to be connected with the shop below, one that sells military accoutrements.


photo credit: www.paris-en-photos.fr

I did discover that Paris boasts an abundance of buildings done up in trompe l’oeil to fool the eye. The one above (not my photo) is of a wall next to a fire station. In the 20th arrondisement it depicts firemen saving a cat from what appears to be the Bridge of Sighs in Venice.

To me, hunting for more examples of trompe l’oeil that I can share on Instagram sounds like perfect excuse to plan another trip to Paris ... as if we needed one! 

As usual around this time of the week, I’m hooking up with Paulita Kincer’s weekly Dreaming of France meme. 



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